• The Fix-It Club's latest FREE Repair Guides:

    Volunteer Your Fix-It Skills

    Volunteer Your Fix-It Skills

    The Fix-It Club offers free repair help with more than 200 Fix-It Guides including instructions on how to maintain and repair household things that break. If you've ever used one of our Fix-It Guides to make a repair, maintain something or to recycle or reuse broken stuff, you are automatically[More...]
    Nails, Bolts, Screws, and Fasteners

    Nails, Bolts, Screws, and Fasteners

    Mechanical fasteners come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and purposes. The Fix-It Club offers basic information on a variety of household repairs. Most repairs require mechanical fasteners. In the photo are (left to right) nails, screws, bolt with washer and nut, and wall anchors. Your home has[More...]
    Home Repair Safety

    Home Repair Safety

    Many electrical appliances have warnings on their outside case to tell you of potential dangers to safety. The Fix-It Club is dedicated to showing you how to easily and safely make hundreds of household repairs. Common repairs made easy! Repair safety is a very important part of[More...]
    How to Find Local Repair Help

    How to Find Local Repair Help

    Local repair services include plumbers, electricians, roofers and other service businesses. The Fix-It Club offers hundreds of free Fix-It Guides for repairing broken things around the home and garage. Occasionally you won't be able to or won't want to fix it yourself. That's okay. There's probably someone[More...]
    Emergency Electrical Repairs

    Emergency Electrical Repairs

    Emergency electrical repairs can turn a good day into a bad one. Fortunately, the Fix-It Club has FREE repair help for electrical repairs and other household emergencies. If your home is having an emergency electrical problem, take a deep breath and keep reading. Turn Off The Power If your emergency electrical problem[More...]
    10 Smart Reasons to Repair

    10 Smart Reasons to Repair

    You can repair household things that break with free, illustrated instructions from the Fix-It Club. Things break. Everything we own, from air conditioners to zippers, eventually wear out or stop working. We can toss them and get new stuff — or we can try to repair them. The[More...]
    15 Forever Car Maintenance Tips

    15 Forever Car Maintenance Tips

    The Fix-It Club is built on the premise that consumer items will last longer if you perform basic maintenance and simple repairs. We purchased our current car new and have followed the following car maintenance tips. It now has 235,000 miles on its odometer and still runs strong! Here are 15[More...]
    Emergency Heating Repairs

    Emergency Heating Repairs

    Maintain your furnace and forced-air distribution system to eliminate winter emergencies. Winters can be cold in many parts of the country. Thankfully, most homes have a primary heating system that keeps indoor temperatures comfortable — until there is a heating emergency. That's when the Fix-It Club can help[More...]
    Easy Repair Tool Kits

    Easy Repair Tool Kits

    The BASIC Fix-It Kit contains tools needed for simple household repairs. Tools are heat treated and chrome plated to resist corrosion, and contained in a handy blow molded case. The Fix-It Club offers simple instructions on how to troubleshoot and repair or recycle household things that break.[More...]
  • Nails, Bolts, Screws, and Fasteners

    Repair Stationary Things

    Mechanical fasteners come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and purposes.

    The Fix-It Club offers basic information on a variety of household repairs. Most repairs require mechanical fasteners. In the photo are (left to right) nails, screws, bolt with washer and nut, and wall anchors.

    Your home has hundreds of fasteners in it, holding walls together, binding appliance components, keeping the floor from moving underfoot, and even fastening sleeves on to clothing.

    All fasteners have a single function: to hold two or more things together. When they don’t, something’s broken. That’s when you need free help from the Fix-It Club.

    Repair Stationary Things

    Types and sizes of nail fasteners.

    Nails

    Nails are thin, pointed metal fasteners driven with a hammer to join two pieces of wood. There are dozens of varieties of nails, depending on the specific purpose. There are special nails for masonry, roofing, finishing, and other common applications. Nails are classified by the size of the shank and the shape of the head. Fix-It Guides refer to specific types of nails needed. The most common type is called common nails, with large, flat heads for secure fastening. Next is finish nails with smaller heads that aren’t so obvious if flush to or below the wood’s surface. Nails are sized by length, indicated by a d or “penny.” A 4d nail is 1-1/2 inches long; an 8d nail is 2-1/2 inches long.

    Repair Stationary Things

    Types and sizes of screw fasteners.

    Screws

    Screws are pointed-tip, threaded fasteners installed with a screwdriver. The type of screwdriver used depends on the type of screw head: Round- and pan (flat)-head screws require a straight-tip screwdriver; Phillips-head screws require a Phillips screwdriver; and square-head screws require a square-drive screwdriver. Wood screws fasten wood, and sheet-metal screws fasten metal. Screws are sized by length. Screws are stronger than nails and easier to remove.

    Bolts and Nuts

    Bolts are flat-tipped, threaded fasteners that use a threaded nut to attach wood or metal together. A washer may be placed under the bolt head or the nut for a firmer fasten. Bolts are classified by the type of head. Stove bolts and machine screws (actually bolts) are turned with a screwdriver. Hexagon- and square-head bolts are held in place with a wrench while the nut is turned to tighten. A carriage bolt‘s head imbeds itself into the wood when the nut is turned. Bolts are sized by length and thread. Bolts are stronger than screws.

    Nuts, usually square or hexagonal blocks of metal with threaded holes, screw onto bolts to hold something together.

    Anchors are additions to bolts or screws that help anchor a fastener in a hollow wall or door. Other handy fasteners include lag bolts, which are bolt heads with screw bodies.

    Thread is a fastener for clothing and upholstered furniture. Thread is a long strand of fabric installed with a needle, either by hand or by a sewing machine. Thread is sold by fabric (cotton, nylon, polyester, etc.) and thickness (Tex or T). Cotton-wrap polyester is used for jeans and poly-wrap polyester for a wide variety of clothing. T-18 thread is light weight and T-50 is medium weight. Thread needles are rated by the eye size, shaft length, and purpose.

    Fix-It Tip

    Velcro can be used for many quick fixes. You can use it to fasten toys, fabric, shoes, wall decorations, and many other things. Velcro is a trademark name for nylon fabric that can be fastened to itself. The back sides of the Velcro are fastened permanently to the object to be fastened, and the front sides of the Velcro adhere to each other when they touch.